Nancy DOWNING

[1592]

____ - ____

Family 1 : Thomas FIELDS
  1. +Sarah Elizabeth FIELDS

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[1592] All data from David Hampton's file.

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Scudders DOWNING

[1217]

____ - ____

Family 1 : Catherine FOREMAN

INDEX

[1217] All data from Halley.

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Thomas DRENNEN

[3250]

____ - ____

Family 1 : Mary BLYTHE

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[3250] All data from Ball.

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Catherine DREW

[1646]

____ - ____

Family 1 : Thomas, Sr. CANDY
  1.  John CANDY

INDEX

[1646] All data from Halley.

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Rachel DREW

[4648]

____ - ____

Family 1 : Joseph Miller ROSS
  1.  Lewis W. ROSS

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[4648] All data from S. Lowry.

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Richard DREW

[437]

____ - ____

Family 1 : Pauline STARR

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[437] All data from Halley.

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Alexander DRUMGOOLE

[3516]

____ - ____

Family 1 : Nancy AUGUSTA
  1. +Nannie DRUMGOOLE

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[3516] Data from Hicks.

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George DRUMGOOLE

[803]

____ - ____

Family 1 : Mary MCDANIEL

INDEX

[803] All data from Halley.

Note from McLeester - This interesting E-mail might appeal to some andmay help answer the question in the subject line.

From: Diarmuid_Drumgole@Dell.com
To: Pumpkin@pcis.net
Subject: There aren't too many Drumgooles around I wonder were Georgeand Fr. John Related
Date: Thursday, April 22, 1999 12:49 PM

Father Christopher C. Drumgoole Shepherd of the Homeless Newsboys
By Peter J. Eckel NCSA Member #321

1988 was the centennial of the death of Reverend John ChristopherDrumgoole, unofficial patron saint to the homeless newsboys of NewYork City. A dark side of human history, the homeless newsboys were atragic happening that occurred in the 19th century, when there lived alost generation of forgotten street urchins —children without dreams,who were victimized by exploitation, corruption, poverty and disease.

The influx of immigrants into New York City tripled the populationwithin twenty years. Such a mass movement of people had no equal inthe history of the human race. Much of the migration came fromcountries where conditions were poor. In Ireland, during the potatofamine, 750,000 persons were believed to have died.

Many of the people seeking a new life were weak and sick when theyleft their native land. Many parents died during the long, hardvoyage, or soon after landing, leaving children in a strange countrywithout family or friends.

Thousands of immigrant children were driven from their home bypoverty. They lived by their wits on the streets of the city. Thereare no relative figures, but a good estimate would be 30,000 desertedkids living in the streets of lower Manhattan; sleeping out like alleycats.
These conditions existed for over fifty years.

In 1875 the increase of brutality to animals resulted in the formationof the ASPCA. But, believe it or not, there were no laws against themistreatment of children. Finally, a law was passed one year later in1876 for their protection. As late as 1890, forty-six hundred kidswere arrested for drunkenness and petty crimes. On a average day, onehundred boys were picked up and locked in the tombs with hardenedcriminals. One-half of the boys would have to be treated for venerealdisease. The New York Sun was the first penny newspaper and also thefirst newspaper ever sold by newsboys on the streets of the city.

This was the Golden Age of the American press and saw theestablishment of New York's great newspapers. Soon there were overfifty dailies creating great competition among the editors. Inaddition, there were thirty-two foreign papers and 120 weeklies beingpublished in the city. This atmosphere gave birth to the newsboys andthousands of homeless tried to earn a living selling newspapers.

Many were as young as six years old. They bought the papers fromdealers and lost money on any that they did not sell. They wereaggressive, shoving the paper under the nose of every passerby, butwho could blame them? Most were homeless and depended on the money tosurvive. In the biting cold of winter the newsboy could be foundyelling the lead story of the day while his teeth chattered.

All the boys were known by nicknames. As a rule, these names indicatedsome personal characteristic. A thin fellow would be called "Skinny".A studious boy would be called "Horace Greeley", "Professor" orsomething similar.

Newspaper Row (which was only two blocks east of the World TradeCenter), was the newsboys' headquarters, better known as PrintingHouse Square, the location of New York’s great newspapers. Directlyacross from City Hall, Printing House Square was the heart of theAmerican press for fifty years. Many of the buildings had to bedemolished to make room for the approaches to the Brooklyn Bridge.

The first organized effort to help the homeless newsboys was made in1853 when Charles Loring Brace, a Protestant Minister, started anewsboys' lodging home, and founded the Children's Aid Society. In aperiod of seventy-five years, they sent 100,000 New York children tothe Mid-West on orphan trains in order to get them away from thestreets of the city.

There were a few other charity organizations and the city governmentprovided facilities for others, but the bulk of the orphans were leftto their own resources. One of the few benefactors of these forgottenboys and girls was John Drumgoole who was born and raised in povertyand knew the needs of the poor. For over twenty-one years he was theSexton/Janitor for Saint Mary's Church on the lower East Side where hepermitted the children of the street to gather in the basement forshelter.

He entered the priesthood late in life and was ordained at the age offifty-three. Two years later he was named Chaplain for the SaintVincent's Newsboys' Home on Warren Street which was close to PrintingHouse Square. It was an old warehouse that the Saint Vincent De PaulSociety converted into sleeping quarters. This was located just fiveblocks north of the World Trade Center.

Father John circulated handbills advertising the home and walked thestreets seeking out abandoned kids. In alleys and dark by-ways alongthe docks and rivers he found them by the numbers. In no time thehome was filled to capacity and had to be expanded. To obtain
a source of income he founded the Saint Joseph's Union. Members paidtwenty-five cents a year. In return, they received a certificate ofmembership and a newspaper called The Homeless Child. The SaintJoseph's Union reached the hearts of the people and The Homeless Childwas soon published in five languages.

In 1881 Father Drumgoole purchased land at the corner of Great Jonesand Lafayette Street where he built the Mission of the ImmaculateVirgin, a ten story building which was the highest in the district.The following year he decided to carry out two more of his dreams: a
vocational school to develop talent by education, and a home for thenewsboys in the country. He purchased a farm on Staten Island andfounded Mount Loretto which was the largest child care institution inthe United States.

In the beginning, the farmers of Princes Bay did not like the idea ofhaving a Catholic institution as a neighbor, but that soon changed.After plowing and planting, Mount Loretto was cultivated into the mostproductive farm on Staten Island. The buildings went up one afteranother. The kids made their own clothes and shoes, grew their ownfood, raised live stock and poultry.

Soon Mount Loretto was able to care for 2,000 children and was free ofany debt.
Everything about Mount Loretto was gigantic. The farm was more than amile square. In the Hen House was an incubator capable of hatching onethousand chickens at one time. The barn was five stories high andhoused 300 head of cattle and many horses. The barn, the largest inthe state and third largest in the country, was a monument to FatherDrumgoole's vision. The herd was sold in 1961 and were the last cowsin New York City.

In 1882 Father John organized a brass band and, until recent years,the Mount Loretto band marched in every Saint Patrick's Day Parade. Atthe time the band was one of the best in the country and evenperformed in the White House.

Father Drumgoole was one of the first commuters between Staten Islandand Manhattan. In March, 1888, on one of his trips, he got caught inthe Great Blizzard. A few weeks later, at the age of 72, he died. Withhis death the newsboys lost their best friend.

It is estimated that one hundred thousand people came to pay theirrespects. The Mass at Saint Patrick's Cathedral was crowded withhundreds of priests, bishops, and thousands of the poor. March 28 ofthis year was the 100th anniversary of his death. Father John isburied at Mount Loretto in a mausoleum overlooking Princes Bay. Amemorial statue was erected in 1894 and placed in front of the Missionat Lafayette Street. It stayed in Manhattan for over twenty-five yearsbefore being moved to Staten Island in 1920. The statue depicts FatherDrumgoole with two boys -- one well-dressed and reading a book and theother a ragged
newsboy who had thrown down his pack of papers and clings to thepriest for protection. The two figures represent the same boy --before and after meeting Father John.

The church at Mount Loretto, completed in 1894, was magnificent. Thesteeple rose 225 feet into the sky. All of the pews, doors, and mostof the trim, were made by the boys in the Mission's grade school. Amemorial stained glass window was dedicated in 1898. On the right wasFather Drumgoole directing his children to Our Lord. In 1972 theBaptism scene in the
Godfather was filmed in the church at Mount Loretto. Throughout theyears many sport figures visited Mount Loretto including Lou Gerhig,Babe Ruth and the great Jack Dempsey.
In 1941 a major highway in Staten Island was named in FatherDrumgoole's honor. In 1973 the New York Board of Education renamedPublic School 36 the Father John C. Drumgoole Annadale School. Tokeep his memory alive, a tower was erected to the church in Abbeylarain Ireland where he was born.

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Nannie DRUMGOOLE

[1486]

ABT 1779 - 23 JUL 1850

Father: Alexander DRUMGOOLE
Mother: Nancy AUGUSTA

Family 1 : DoubleHead
  1. +Bird Tail DOUBLEHEAD
  2. +Peggy DOUBLEHEAD

                              __
                             |  
                           __|__
                          |     
                        __|
                       |  |
                       |  |   __
                       |  |  |  
                       |  |__|__
                       |        
 _Alexander DRUMGOOLE _|
|                      |
|                      |      __
|                      |     |  
|                      |   __|__
|                      |  |     
|                      |__|
|                         |
|                         |   __
|                         |  |  
|                         |__|__
|                               
|
|--Nannie DRUMGOOLE 
|  (1779 - 1850)
|                             __
|                            |  
|                          __|__
|                         |     
|                       __|
|                      |  |
|                      |  |   __
|                      |  |  |  
|                      |  |__|__
|                      |        
|_Nancy AUGUSTA _______|
                       |
                       |      __
                       |     |  
                       |   __|__
                       |  |     
                       |__|
                          |
                          |   __
                          |  |  
                          |__|__
                                

INDEX

[1486] Data from Hicks as Nannie the Pain. Starr lists Nannie "the Pain" asNannie Drumgoole nee Doublehead.

[Cherokee Advocate, Aug 6, 1850, Obituary of Nancy Springston]
Born c. 1775 - died July 23, 1850. Her four surviving children were ather side at the time of her death at the house of Anderson Springston.She also had 73 grandchildren.
***********************
John L. Springston's notes on his Miller Application:

Sir: My grandmother on my fathers side was named Nancy. She was a fullblood Indian of the Cherokee Tribe. She had four sets of children,Springston, Foreman, Wilson and Doublehead and as I understand thecase, she must have been enrolled in 1835,36. 1846 & 1833 or earlierthan 1835. I want to find her name and her families by name. Mygrandfathers name was John. I think he had by his marriage to herthree children - Anderson, my father, & Isaac & Edley Springston. Myuncles by her Foreman marriage she had only one I am aware, his namewas Jim or James Foreman. By her Doublehead marriage she had only oneas far as I know, his name was Bird Doublehead. Her marriage to WilsonI am lost. She died prior to 1851 (this contradicts his otherstatement). Now as far as the Cherokee Indian record will show her Iwish an examination thereof - my father Anderson Springston was born10-13-1814 and I think Isaac was older than he - Edley I am unable tosay.

Nancy, my said grandma had two brothers and two sisters as I wasinformed by my father & mother both and I ask as to who her censusshows they were - if possible - as to claim on them. I cannot be anyto certain, or not enough to swear to positive. I ask for suchinformation as is possible from the rolls showing them so I can applywith a certainty.

They were all emigrants and resided in Delaware District CherokeeNation West and I think in Tennessee East - not far from GuntersLanding on the Tennessee River. It is my desire to apply for allpossible where (the rest is illegible). This is signed 10-8-1906.
************************
In another letter he states that she had two brothers and two sisters.

Another letter states: "Nan-que-se, my grandmother Nancy Springston'sniece -- Nancy in same family, the relation bore to each I do notknow-- also, Isaac, sister of my grandmother Nancy --Che-ne-lern-ky --relationship only as fixed by the relationship existing between thenamed emigrants.

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William Clayton DRURY

[2651]

____ - ____

Family 1 : Lilly May BROWN

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[2651] All data from Maples.

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